findout

From the series Oaxacan Exodous

Nearly 500,000 indigenous Mexican immigrants, mostly Mixtecos, Zapotecos and Triquis, from the state of Oaxaca, are now estimated to be living in the United States. They are among the most isolated immigrants ever to arrive in America. Some speak only their indigenous language, and some come from villages without cars, electricity, or indoor plumbing.

In California’s Central Valley, where over half of these new migrants have settled, they are quickly becoming a new rural underclass. Living on the fringes of the Valley’s farm labor economy, and isolated by their culture and language, they suffer some of the worst abuses and exploitation in the country.

 Matt Black. 

Star Fucking Hipsters full set from a 2009 show at 924 Gilman, co-headlining for Citizen Fish. This was the second show I booked for them that year, the first was a Plan 9 show that I added them to last minute because Aaron Cometbus was friends with (and vouched for) them, not to mention the whole Leftover Crack connection, which made me think they’d help the bill out from a draw standpoint. Some bridges were obviously burned this night, and I don’t think Leftover Crack ever returned to Gilman after the huge show they played there in 2008.

When you move to the East Bay, particularly Oakland, and you jump on the ‘let’s talk shit on Berkeley’ bandwagon, you’re showing your ignorance when it comes to the history of an area you moved to.  This perception that Berkeley’s only claim to fame is the Free Speech Movement or People’s Park ignores the last 25-30 years of alternative culture that emerged from the rubble of Berkeley’s crumbling ’60s idealism.  Berkeley, California in the nineteen eighties and nineties had one of the strongest, most active underground hip hop and graffiti scenes in the Bay Area.  Even rap crews from Oakland, like the Hieroglyphics crew, were known to work, hustle, and kick it in Berkeley, primarily Telegraph Ave.  This photo dates back to 1998, but GIGS is still active in 2014, and locals probably remember his old crew TPC crushing the East Bay back in the late eighties.

When you move to the East Bay, particularly Oakland, and you jump on the ‘let’s talk shit on Berkeley’ bandwagon, you’re showing your ignorance when it comes to the history of an area you moved to.  This perception that Berkeley’s only claim to fame is the Free Speech Movement or People’s Park ignores the last 25-30 years of alternative culture that emerged from the rubble of Berkeley’s crumbling ’60s idealism.  Berkeley, California in the nineteen eighties and nineties had one of the strongest, most active underground hip hop and graffiti scenes in the Bay Area.  Even rap crews from Oakland, like the Hieroglyphics crew, were known to work, hustle, and kick it in Berkeley, primarily Telegraph Ave.  This photo dates back to 1998, but GIGS is still active in 2014, and locals probably remember his old crew TPC crushing the East Bay back in the late eighties.